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Biography

Laoise O'Brien is a musician and producer based in Kilkenny City in Ireland. She divides her time between her music production company and her career-long championing of the recorder. She studied flute at the College of Music in Dublin, recorder at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam, and holds a Masters in musicology from the National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

As a performer, Laoise is in regular demand and has appeared as a soloist and guest musician with numerous ensembles including the Irish Chamber Orchestra, Irish Baroque Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, Opera Theatre Company, Resurgam, Sestina, The Irish Consort, and Camerata Kilkenny. She is a member of the early music group, The Gregory Walkers and is one half of the duo, Temenos with clarinetist, Paul Roe. This unusual pairing of instruments has resulted in many new compositions for the duo.

 

Laoise has been involved in the design and delivery of programmes for Kilkenny Arts Festival, Galway Early Music Festival, East Cork Early Music Festival, Killaloe Chamber Music Festival, MusicTown, The Ark Children's Cultural Centre, Culture Night, LoveLive Music, Music Network, Music Generation, Dublin Institute of Technology, The Heritage Council, and RTÉ.

 

Laoise was the featured artist of the hugely popular Kaleidoscope Night series for the 2018/2019 season.

In addition, Laoise has presented two documentaries for RTÉ lyric fm: the award winning, Sonnets for the Cradle and Goedemorgen, Amsterdam, a feature on the National Youth Orchestra of Ireland's tour to the Netherlands in 2018.

 

Laoise holds a lecturing position at the TU Dublin Conservatoire of Music and Drama, Dublin. She has previously lectured in the CIT Cork School of Music and is regularly invited to examine, adjudicate and deliver workshops in

institutes around the country.

"Laoise O'Brien's mesmerising skill on this often abused instrument"

                                                             - Michael Dervan, The Irish Times